Identifying the Future

Identifying MMIn 1990 the medical community warned that I may not fully recover. Some professionals thought I may spend the rest of my life in an institution. The future looked grim. Few people predicted a positive future, especially as I hadn’t been successful at life up to that point. Yet, with support, good fortune, and doing seven things that aided my recovery I did better than expected.

In 1994 I met Mavor Moore. He became my mentor, and that was a major part of my recovery; for, he believed in me. After he died I published a book about him. I am grateful that it is now available as an e-book called Identifying Mavor MooreDownload it to learn more about this amazing man who helped create the Canadian identity.

*****

In the spring of 1990 Allan Boss was in a motor vehicle accident. He suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. The attending neurosurgeon informed his family that he would never walk again or talk again. He went on to achieve three university degrees, has written/edited four published books, has run four marathons, and is currently writing a non-fiction book about his recovery.

Want to learn more? Email info@allanboss.ca  with the subject Send Me the Free Outline to his book, The Memory Box.

Do Helmets Prevent Brain Injury

I won’t draw this one out. The simple answer is yes.

Research in The American Journal of Surgery reveals that helmets “cut the risk of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) by half when riders suffer a head injury [….] Riders with helmets were also less likely to die from their injuries, and less likely to break facial bones, than those not wearing a helmet.” (Helmets prevent severe head injuries in bike accidents)

The study also revealed that 52%of the people who were wearing helmets when they crashed, significantly reduced their risk of severe TBI. If you need more convincing, consider that the helmeted cyclists were 44% less likely to die when if wearing a helmet.

In addition, the centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that fewer than 50% of people who ride bicycles actually wear helmets. This statistic is particularly alarming  when considering that “there were 900 deaths and an estimated 494,000 emergency room visits due to bicycle-related injuries in 2013.” (Helmets prevent severe head injuries in bike accidents) Of the nearly 500,000 people who crashed their bikes, only about 125,000 were wearing helmets. Consider too, that of the 75% of people who crashed their bicycles, more than 50% suffered severe traumatic brain injuries. A full 3% died.

The short of it is this: when riding a bicycle, put on a helmet. I’ll say it again: put on a helmet.

*****

In the spring of 1990 Allan Boss was in a motor vehicle accident. He suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. The attending neurosurgeon informed his family that he would never walk again or talk again. He went on to achieve three university degrees, has written/edited four published books, has run four marathons, and is currently writing a non-fiction book about his recovery.

Want to learn more? Email info@allanboss.ca  with the subject Send Me the Free Outline to his book, The Memory Box.

Bolster your Brain With Music

Today I came across an article in the Washington Post, titled Music lessons spur emotional and behavioral growth in children. Dr. James Hudziak, professor of psychiatry at the University of Vermont and director of the Vermont Center for Children, Youth and Families, said this study reminded him of how important it is developmentally for children to learn an instrument.

Hudziak said, “Everyone in our culture knows if I lift 5-pound, 10-pound, 15-pound weights, my biceps will get bigger. The same is true for the brain. We shouldn’t be surprised we can train the brain.”

In 2009 Dr. Daniel J. Levitin wrote his ground-breaking book This is your Brain on Music, which considered how people’s brains react when listening to music and playing musical instruments. Simply, when you’re playing an instrument your entire brain lights up; immense benefits are associated with this activity.

It’s sort of like a Burpee for the brain. Be it a harmonica, a flute, a drum, a guitar, or singing a song. Get some music happening in your life now. You’re brain will thank you.

*****

In the spring of 1990 Allan Boss was in a motor vehicle accident. He suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. The attending neurosurgeon informed his family that he would never walk again or talk again. He went on to achieve three university degrees, has written/edited four published books, has run four marathons, and is currently writing a non-fiction book about his recovery.

Want to learn more? Email info@allanboss.ca  with the subject Send Me the Free Outline to his book, The Memory Box.

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